Entityy III: The Feeling of Style

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Entityy III: The Feeling of Style

You look at yourself in the mirror, and nothing fits quite right. None of the lines of clothing lie flat the way you want them to. Your body overflows in uncomfortable ways. Those pants cling around the hips just enough to make you shift with discomfort, or just not recognize the person you know you are.

You might also have stumbled across a growing number of pieces of writing, sites, filmic representations of diverse gender presentations. It can look like any of the sum of a huge range of little accessory and fit choices.

From tuxedos being worn by an increasingly broad range of people from the feminine, femme and female-identified to a more ‘masculine’ cut on tv, at award shows, in advertising campaigns like Emily Blunt and Cate Blanchett’s work for the IWC Portofino collection. Or perhaps you want your tuxedo custom-fit, like from bespoke clothiers Saint Harridan, Sharpe Suiting, and more. You may just want to show up at that prom or that wedding in the right style for you. The images range from glamorous, intense and dreamy old-Hollywood style ‘scapes on Italian coastlines to the grittier representations of prison garb styling on Orange Is The New Black, or former The L Word star Katherine Moennig’s casual rock and roll aesthetic.

That t-shirt sits just-so on my shoulders. It skims the hips, embraces little more than my identity, and makes me feel entirely who I am – powerful, rock’n’roll today, ready to take on the world. These joggers came from a place local to me, a store where no one looked askance at my body as I thumbed racks. And they go perfectly with these lace-ups that I found. Today I get to badass the world. Exactly my way.

There are growing numbers of ‘trend pieces’ that would have you believe that somehow wanting to dress like yourself is a new thing. That being more at home in a range of clothing styles and fits that have been less celebrated over the years is something recent, something new, somehow only a thing because it’s just now being written in media, just now acknowledged in The New York Times or Huffington Post or style magazines.

Perhaps we’re just finally seeing the conditions to explore the full spectrum of possibility come about. Crowdfunding campaigns have certainly been particularly useful in the beginnings of a shift – now you can get the investors in your company from the very communities who are your markets, doubling campaigns to start businesses as PR initiatives, gauging the interest in your company and products and trialling new style lookbooks as you raise the cash to make those dreams come true. New ‘masculine’-style shoe manufacturer, Nik Kacy did that, broadening the range of sizes of shoes available to the masculine-affiliated and genderqueer consumer, while raising money and simultaneously giving back to the queer community with their campaign.

You need new clothes. Everything is feeling wrong. Or just too worn. Going about everyday things is getting harder without the right kicks or pants. But that last store – the weird looks you got. That shirt is just a shirt, and it might have fit. It sat there on the rack with such promise to end this frustrating style phase, but that department store clerk had a face on about it – such a face, such judgement in their eyes. And it felt too hard.

Clothing, fashion, being able to present and live in your own favorite ready-for-anything ways, they do a wide set of things in the world. You feel it when you find the perfect crisp white shirt. You feel it when the sun hits your skin and warms you in just the right places. You feel it when the object of your desire smiles into your face and grins with enthusiasm. And those moments don’t have to be determined by other people’s ideas of how you should be. Just yours.

It’s essentially those premises that have created online and mail order options. Greyscale Goods, a box style order option that’s upcoming after a successful crowdfunding campaign themselves, takes that idea head-on. You don’t need to deal with in-person situations, instead creating your perfect androgynous or gender diverse style from your own home, with a few mouse clicks.

What does the outfit of your dreams look like? When you’re living your best self? When you’re looking for love? When you’re kissing the person you adore? When you get that interview? That promotion? That chance to live as your most open and awesome version?

WildFang’s collaboration on a short film, Rachel Evan Would, features a bunch of scenarios in a day of living daringly and taking on challenge, while amazing stars of creativity join in on karaoke battles, book-signings and more. Living those ways come in pop-up store options – or walk-in if you happen to be lucky enough to live near their Portland storefront – and their fits are not classic runway. They join designers like VEEA, Veer, and HauteButch. In fact, they and many other similar designers and models are heavily featured in the recent Queer Fashion Week in Oakland, which uses a full range of models and bodily expressions to represent fashion as we know it, queerly.

But no matter how you feel about your body, sexuality, queerness or gender expression, having a stronger range of silhouettes and ways to access them is going to add to the ways you can be authentically you. In classic style or working-hands overalls. Any way you want it, we’re starting to get it.

You look at yourself in the mirror, and nothing fits quite right. None of the lines of clothing lie flat the way you want them to. Your body overflows in uncomfortable ways. Those pants cling around the hips just enough to make you shift with discomfort, or just not recognize the person you know you are.

You might also have stumbled across a growing number of pieces of writing, sites, filmic representations of diverse gender presentations. It can look like any of the sum of a huge range of little accessory and fit choices.

From tuxedos being worn by an increasingly broad range of people from the feminine, femme and female-identified to a more ‘masculine’ cut on tv, at award shows, in advertising campaigns like Emily Blunt and Cate Blanchett’s work for the IWC Portofino collection. Or perhaps you want your tuxedo custom-fit, like from bespoke clothiers Saint Harridan, Sharpe Suiting, and more. You may just want to show up at that prom or that wedding in the right style for you. The images range from glamorous, intense and dreamy old-Hollywood style ‘scapes on Italian coastlines to the grittier representations of prison garb styling on Orange Is The New Black, or former The L Word star Katherine Moennig’s casual rock and roll aesthetic.

That t-shirt sits just-so on my shoulders. It skims the hips, embraces little more than my identity, and makes me feel entirely who I am – powerful, rock’n’roll today, ready to take on the world. These joggers came from a place local to me, a store where no one looked askance at my body as I thumbed racks. And they go perfectly with these lace-ups that I found. Today I get to badass the world. Exactly my way.

There are growing numbers of ‘trend pieces’ that would have you believe that somehow wanting to dress like yourself is a new thing. That being more at home in a range of clothing styles and fits that have been less celebrated over the years is something recent, something new, somehow only a thing because it’s just now being written in media, just now acknowledged in The New York Times or Huffington Post or style magazines.

Perhaps we’re just finally seeing the conditions to explore the full spectrum of possibility come about. Crowdfunding campaigns have certainly been particularly useful in the beginnings of a shift – now you can get the investors in your company from the very communities who are your markets, doubling campaigns to start businesses as PR initiatives, gauging the interest in your company and products and trialling new style lookbooks as you raise the cash to make those dreams come true. New ‘masculine’-style shoe manufacturer, Nik Kacy did that, broadening the range of sizes of shoes available to the masculine-affiliated and genderqueer consumer, while raising money and simultaneously giving back to the queer community with their campaign.

You need new clothes. Everything is feeling wrong. Or just too worn. Going about everyday things is getting harder without the right kicks or pants. But that last store – the weird looks you got. That shirt is just a shirt, and it might have fit. It sat there on the rack with such promise to end this frustrating style phase, but that department store clerk had a face on about it – such a face, such judgement in their eyes. And it felt too hard.

Clothing, fashion, being able to present and live in your own favorite ready-for-anything ways, they do a wide set of things in the world. You feel it when you find the perfect crisp white shirt. You feel it when the sun hits your skin and warms you in just the right places. You feel it when the object of your desire smiles into your face and grins with enthusiasm. And those moments don’t have to be determined by other people’s ideas of how you should be. Just yours.

It’s essentially those premises that have created online and mail order options. Greyscale Goods, a box style order option that’s upcoming after a successful crowdfunding campaign themselves, takes that idea head-on. You don’t need to deal with in-person situations, instead creating your perfect androgynous or gender diverse style from your own home, with a few mouse clicks.

What does the outfit of your dreams look like? When you’re living your best self? When you’re looking for love? When you’re kissing the person you adore? When you get that interview? That promotion? That chance to live as your most open and awesome version?

WildFang’s collaboration on a short film, Rachel Evan Would, features a bunch of scenarios in a day of living daringly and taking on challenge, while amazing stars of creativity join in on karaoke battles, book-signings and more. Living those ways come in pop-up store options – or walk-in if you happen to be lucky enough to live near their Portland storefront – and their fits are not classic runway. They join designers like VEEA, Veer, and HauteButch. In fact, they and many other similar designers and models are heavily featured in the recent Queer Fashion Week in Oakland, which uses a full range of models and bodily expressions to represent fashion as we know it, queerly.

But no matter how you feel about your body, sexuality, queerness or gender expression, having a stronger range of silhouettes and ways to access them is going to add to the ways you can be authentically you. In classic style or working-hands overalls. Any way you want it, we’re starting to get it.

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By | 2016-03-23T01:47:47+00:00 June 1st, 2015|Print Magazine|Comments Off on Entityy III: The Feeling of Style

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